We found 45 words by descrambling these letters FOLPOWOT

4 Letter Words Unscramble From Letters folpowot


3 Letter Words Unscramble From Letters folpowot


2 Letter Words Unscramble From Letters folpowot


More About The Unscrambled Letters FOLPOWOT

Our word unscrambler discovered 45 words from the 8 scrambled letters (F L O O O P T W) you search for!

Furthermore, we grouped the results into the following categories:

  • There are 19 - 4 letter words
  • There are 20 - 3 letter words
  • There are 6 - 2 letter words

What Can The Letters FOLPOWOT Mean ?

These are the meanings of the letters FOLPOWOT when you unscramble them.

  • Flop (n.)
    Act of flopping.
  • Flop (v. i.)
    To fall, sink, or throw one's self, heavily, clumsily, and unexpectedly on the ground.
  • Flop (v. i.)
    To strike about with something broad abd flat, as a fish with its tail, or a bird with its wings; to rise and fall; as, the brim of a hat flops.
  • Flop (v. t.)
    To clap or strike, as a bird its wings, a fish its tail, etc.; to flap.
  • Flop (v. t.)
    To turn suddenly, as something broad and flat.
  • Flow ()
    imp. sing. of Fly, v. i.
  • Flow (n.)
    A continuous movement of something abundant; as, a flow of words.
  • Flow (n.)
    A low-lying piece of watery land; -- called also flow moss and flow bog.
  • Flow (n.)
    A stream of water or other fluid; a current; as, a flow of water; a flow of blood.
  • Flow (n.)
    Any gentle, gradual movement or procedure of thought, diction, music, or the like, resembling the quiet, steady movement of a river; a stream.
  • Flow (n.)
    The tidal setting in of the water from the ocean to the shore. See Ebb and flow, under Ebb.
  • Flow (v. i.)
    To become liquid; to melt.
  • Flow (v. i.)
    To discharge blood in excess from the uterus.
  • Flow (v. i.)
    To glide along smoothly, without harshness or asperties; as, a flowing period; flowing numbers; to sound smoothly to the ear; to be uttered easily.
  • Flow (v. i.)
    To hang loose and waving; as, a flowing mantle; flowing locks.
  • Flow (v. i.)
    To have or be in abundance; to abound; to full, so as to run or flow over; to be copious.
  • Flow (v. i.)
    To move with a continual change of place among the particles or parts, as a fluid; to change place or circulate, as a liquid; as, rivers flow from springs and lakes; tears flow from the eyes.
  • Flow (v. i.)
    To proceed; to issue forth; as, wealth flows from industry and economy.
  • Flow (v. i.)
    To rise, as the tide; -- opposed to ebb; as, the tide flows twice in twenty-four hours.
  • Flow (v. t.)
    To cover with varnish.
  • Flow (v. t.)
    To cover with water or other liquid; to overflow; to inundate; to flood.
  • Fool (n.)
    A compound of gooseberries scalded and crushed, with cream; -- commonly called gooseberry fool.
  • Fool (n.)
    A person deficient in intellect; one who acts absurdly, or pursues a course contrary to the dictates of wisdom; one without judgment; a simpleton; a dolt.
  • Fool (n.)
    One destitute of reason, or of the common powers of understanding; an idiot; a natural.
  • Fool (n.)
    One who acts contrary to moral and religious wisdom; a wicked person.
  • Fool (n.)
    One who counterfeits folly; a professional jester or buffoon; a retainer formerly kept to make sport, dressed fantastically in motley, with ridiculous accouterments.
  • Fool (v. i.)
    To play the fool; to trifle; to toy; to spend time in idle sport or mirth.
  • Fool (v. t.)
    To infatuate; to make foolish.
  • Fool (v. t.)
    To use as a fool; to deceive in a shameful or mortifying manner; to impose upon; to cheat by inspiring foolish confidence; as, to fool one out of his money.
  • Foot (n.)
    A combination of syllables consisting a metrical element of a verse, the syllables being formerly distinguished by their quantity or length, but in modern poetry by the accent.
  • Foot (n.)
    A measure of length equivalent to twelve inches; one third of a yard. See Yard.
  • Foot (n.)
    Fundamental principle; basis; plan; -- used only in the singular.
  • Foot (n.)
    Recognized condition; rank; footing; -- used only in the singular.
  • Foot (n.)
    Soldiers who march and fight on foot; the infantry, usually designated as the foot, in distinction from the cavalry.
  • Foot (n.)
    That which corresponds to the foot of a man or animal; as, the foot of a table; the foot of a stocking.
  • Foot (n.)
    The lower edge of a sail.
  • Foot (n.)
    The lowest part or base; the ground part; the bottom, as of a mountain or column; also, the last of a row or series; the end or extremity, esp. if associated with inferiority; as, the foot of a hill; the foot of the procession; the foot of a class; the foot of the bed.
  • Foot (n.)
    The muscular locomotive organ of a mollusk. It is a median organ arising from the ventral region of body, often in the form of a flat disk, as in snails. See Illust. of Buccinum.
  • Foot (n.)
    The terminal part of the leg of man or an animal; esp., the part below the ankle or wrist; that part of an animal upon which it rests when standing, or moves. See Manus, and Pes.
  • Foot (v. i.)
    To tread to measure or music; to dance; to trip; to skip.
  • Foot (v. i.)
    To walk; -- opposed to ride or fly.
  • Foot (v. t.)
    The size or strike with the talon.
  • Foot (v. t.)
    To kick with the foot; to spurn.
  • Foot (v. t.)
    To renew the foot of, as of stocking.
  • Foot (v. t.)
    To set on foot; to establish; to land.
  • Foot (v. t.)
    To sum up, as the numbers in a column; -- sometimes with up; as, to foot (or foot up) an account.
  • Foot (v. t.)
    To tread; as, to foot the green.
  • Fowl (n.)
    Any bird; esp., any large edible bird.
  • Fowl (n.)
    Any domesticated bird used as food, as a hen, turkey, duck; in a more restricted sense, the common domestic cock or hen (Gallus domesticus).
  • Fowl (v. i.)
    To catch or kill wild fowl, for game or food, as by shooting, or by decoys, nets, etc.
  • Loft (a.)
    Lofty; proud.
  • Loft (n.)
    A floor or room placed above another; a story.
  • Loft (n.)
    A gallery or raised apartment in a church, hall, etc.; as, an organ loft.
  • Loft (n.)
    That which is lifted up; an elevation.
  • Loft (n.)
    The room or space under a roof and above the ceiling of the uppermost story.
  • Loof (n.)
    Formerly, some appurtenance of a vessel which was used in changing her course; -- probably a large paddle put over the lee bow to help bring her head nearer to the wind.
  • Loof (n.)
    The part of a ship's side where the planking begins to curve toward bow and stern.
  • Loof (n.)
    The spongelike fibers of the fruit of a cucurbitaceous plant (Luffa Aegyptiaca); called also vegetable sponge.
  • Loof (v. i.)
    See Luff.
  • Loop (n.)
    A curve of any kind in the form of a loop.
  • Loop (n.)
    A fold or doubling of a thread, cord, rope, etc., through which another thread, cord, etc., can be passed, or which a hook can be hooked into; an eye, as of metal; a staple; a noose; a bight.
  • Loop (n.)
    A mass of iron in a pasty condition gathered into a ball for the tilt hammer or rolls.
  • Loop (n.)
    A small, narrow opening; a loophole.
  • Loop (n.)
    A wire forming part of a main circuit and returning to the point from which it starts.
  • Loop (n.)
    The portion of a vibrating string, air column, etc., between two nodes; -- called also ventral segment.
  • Loop (v. t.)
    To make a loop of or in; to fasten with a loop or loops; -- often with up; as, to loop a string; to loop up a curtain.
  • Loot (n.)
    Plunder; booty; especially, the boot taken in a conquered or sacked city.
  • Loot (n.)
    The act of plundering.
  • Loot (v. t. & i.)
    To plunder; to carry off as plunder or a prize lawfully obtained by war.
  • Plot (n.)
    A plan or draught of a field, farm, estate, etc., drawn to a scale.
  • Plot (n.)
    A plan; a purpose.
  • Plot (n.)
    A plantation laid out.
  • Plot (n.)
    A share in such a plot or scheme; a participation in any stratagem or conspiracy.
  • Plot (n.)
    A small extent of ground; a plat; as, a garden plot.
  • Plot (n.)
    Any scheme, stratagem, secret design, or plan, of a complicated nature, adapted to the accomplishment of some purpose, usually a treacherous and mischievous one; a conspiracy; an intrigue; as, the Rye-house Plot.
  • Plot (n.)
    Contrivance; deep reach of thought; ability to plot or intrigue.
  • Plot (n.)
    In fiction, the story of a play, novel, romance, or poem, comprising a complication of incidents which are gradually unfolded, sometimes by unexpected means.
  • Plot (v. i.)
    To contrive a plan or stratagem; to scheme.
  • Plot (v. i.)
    To form a scheme of mischief against another, especially against a government or those who administer it; to conspire.
  • Plot (v. t.)
    To make a plot, map, pr plan, of; to mark the position of on a plan; to delineate.
  • Plot (v. t.)
    To plan; to scheme; to devise; to contrive secretly.
  • Plow (n.)
    Alt. of Plough
  • Plow (v. i.)
    Alt. of Plough
  • Plow (v. t.)
    Alt. of Plough
  • Polo (n.)
    A game of ball of Eastern origin, resembling hockey, with the players on horseback.
  • Polo (n.)
    A similar game played on the ice, or on a prepared floor, by players wearing skates.
  • poof (unknown)
    Sorry. I don't have the meaning of this word.
  • Pool (n.)
    A combination of persons contributing money to be used for the purpose of increasing or depressing the market price of stocks, grain, or other commodities; also, the aggregate of the sums so contributed; as, the pool took all the wheat offered below the limit; he put $10,000 into the pool.
  • Pool (n.)
    A game at billiards, in which each of the players stakes a certain sum, the winner taking the whole; also, in public billiard rooms, a game in which the loser pays the entrance fee for all who engage in the game; a game of skill in pocketing the balls on a pool table.
  • Pool (n.)
    A mutual arrangement between competing lines, by which the receipts of all are aggregated, and then distributed pro rata according to agreement.
  • Pool (n.)
    A small and rather deep collection of (usually) fresh water, as one supplied by a spring, or occurring in the course of a stream; a reservoir for water; as, the pools of Solomon.
  • Pool (n.)
    A small body of standing or stagnant water; a puddle.
  • Pool (n.)
    An aggregation of properties or rights, belonging to different people in a community, in a common fund, to be charged with common liabilities.
  • Pool (n.)
    Any gambling or commercial venture in which several persons join.
  • Pool (n.)
    In rifle shooting, a contest in which each competitor pays a certain sum for every shot he makes, the net proceeds being divided among the winners.
  • Pool (n.)
    The stake played for in certain games of cards, billiards, etc.; an aggregated stake to which each player has contributed a snare; also, the receptacle for the stakes.
  • Pool (v. i.)
    To combine or contribute with others, as for a commercial, speculative, or gambling transaction.
  • Pool (v. t.)
    To put together; to contribute to a common fund, on the basis of a mutual division of profits or losses; to make a common interest of; as, the companies pooled their traffic.
  • Tool (n.)
    A machine for cutting or shaping materials; -- also called machine tool.
  • Tool (n.)
    A person used as an instrument by another person; -- a word of reproach; as, men of intrigue have their tools, by whose agency they accomplish their purposes.
  • Tool (n.)
    A weapon.
  • Tool (n.)
    An instrument such as a hammer, saw, plane, file, and the like, used in the manual arts, to facilitate mechanical operations; any instrument used by a craftsman or laborer at his work; an implement; as, the tools of a joiner, smith, shoe-maker, etc.; also, a cutter, chisel, or other part of an instrument or machine that dresses work.
  • Tool (n.)
    Hence, any instrument of use or service.
  • Tool (v. t.)
    To drive, as a coach.
  • Tool (v. t.)
    To shape, form, or finish with a tool.
  • topo (unknown)
    Sorry. I don't have the meaning of this word.
  • Wolf (a.)
    A white worm, or maggot, which infests granaries.
  • Wolf (a.)
    A willying machine.
  • Wolf (a.)
    An eating ulcer or sore. Cf. Lupus.
  • Wolf (a.)
    Any one of several species of wild and savage carnivores belonging to the genus Canis and closely allied to the common dog. The best-known and most destructive species are the European wolf (Canis lupus), the American gray, or timber, wolf (C. occidentalis), and the prairie wolf, or coyote. Wolves often hunt in packs, and may thus attack large animals and even man.
  • Wolf (a.)
    Fig.: Any very ravenous, rapacious, or destructive person or thing; especially, want; starvation; as, they toiled hard to keep the wolf from the door.
  • Wolf (a.)
    In bowed instruments, a harshness due to defective vibration in certain notes of the scale.
  • Wolf (a.)
    One of the destructive, and usually hairy, larvae of several species of beetles and grain moths; as, the bee wolf.
  • Wolf (a.)
    The harsh, howling sound of some of the chords on an organ or piano tuned by unequal temperament.
  • Woof (n.)
    Texture; cloth; as, a pall of softest woof.
  • Woof (n.)
    The threads that cross the warp in a woven fabric; the weft; the filling; the thread usually carried by the shuttle in weaving.
  • Wool (n.)
    A sort of pubescence, or a clothing of dense, curling hairs on the surface of certain plants.
  • Wool (n.)
    Short, thick hair, especially when crisped or curled.
  • Wool (n.)
    The soft and curled, or crisped, species of hair which grows on sheep and some other animals, and which in fineness sometimes approaches to fur; -- chiefly applied to the fleecy coat of the sheep, which constitutes a most essential material of clothing in all cold and temperate climates.
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