We found 98 words by descrambling these letters CULRAGE

5 Letter Words Unscramble From Letters culrage


4 Letter Words Unscramble From Letters culrage


3 Letter Words Unscramble From Letters culrage


2 Letter Words Unscramble From Letters culrage


More About The Unscrambled Letters CULRAGE

Our word unscrambler discovered 98 words from the 7 scrambled letters (A C E G L R U) you search for!

Furthermore, we grouped the results into the following categories:

  • There are 23 - 5 letter words
  • There are 35 - 4 letter words
  • There are 32 - 3 letter words
  • There are 8 - 2 letter words

What Can The Letters CULRAGE Mean ?

These are the meanings of the letters CULRAGE when you unscramble them.

  • argle (unknown)
    Sorry. I don't have the meaning of this word.
  • Argue (v. i.)
    To contend in argument; to dispute; to reason; -- followed by with; as, you may argue with your friend without convincing him.
  • Argue (v. i.)
    To invent and offer reasons to support or overthrow a proposition, opinion, or measure; to use arguments; to reason.
  • Argue (v. t.)
    To blame; to accuse; to charge with.
  • Argue (v. t.)
    To debate or discuss; to treat by reasoning; as, the counsel argued the cause before a full court; the cause was well argued.
  • Argue (v. t.)
    To persuade by reasons; as, to argue a man into a different opinion.
  • Argue (v. t.)
    To prove or evince; too manifest or exhibit by inference, deduction, or reasoning.
  • Auger (n.)
    A carpenter's tool for boring holes larger than those bored by a gimlet. It has a handle placed crosswise by which it is turned with both hands. A pod auger is one with a straight channel or groove, like the half of a bean pod. A screw auger has a twisted blade, by the spiral groove of which the chips are discharge.
  • Auger (n.)
    An instrument for boring or perforating soils or rocks, for determining the quality of soils, or the nature of the rocks or strata upon which they lie, and for obtaining water.
  • cager (unknown)
    Sorry. I don't have the meaning of this word.
  • carle (unknown)
    Sorry. I don't have the meaning of this word.
  • Clear (adv.)
    In a clear manner; plainly.
  • Clear (adv.)
    Without limitation; wholly; quite; entirely; as, to cut a piece clear off.
  • Clear (n.)
    Full extent; distance between extreme limits; especially; the distance between the nearest surfaces of two bodies, or the space between walls; as, a room ten feet square in the clear.
  • Clear (superl.)
    Able to perceive clearly; keen; acute; penetrating; discriminating; as, a clear intellect; a clear head.
  • Clear (superl.)
    Easily or distinctly heard; audible; canorous.
  • Clear (superl.)
    Free from ambiguity or indistinctness; lucid; perspicuous; plain; evident; manifest; indubitable.
  • Clear (superl.)
    Free from embarrassment; detention, etc.
  • Clear (superl.)
    Free from guilt or stain; unblemished.
  • Clear (superl.)
    Free from impediment or obstruction; unobstructed; as, a clear view; to keep clear of debt.
  • Clear (superl.)
    Free from opaqueness; transparent; bright; light; luminous; unclouded.
  • Clear (superl.)
    Not clouded with passion; serene; cheerful.
  • Clear (superl.)
    Without defect or blemish, such as freckles or knots; as, a clear complexion; clear lumber.
  • Clear (superl.)
    Without diminution; in full; net; as, clear profit.
  • Clear (superl.)
    Without mixture; entirely pure; as, clear sand.
  • Clear (v. i.)
    To become free from clouds or fog; to become fair; -- often followed by up, off, or away.
  • Clear (v. i.)
    To disengage one's self from incumbrances, distress, or entanglements; to become free.
  • Clear (v. i.)
    To make exchanges of checks and bills, and settle balances, as is done in a clearing house.
  • Clear (v. i.)
    To obtain a clearance; as, the steamer cleared for Liverpool to-day.
  • Clear (v. t.)
    To free from impediment or incumbrance, from defilement, or from anything injurious, useless, or offensive; as, to clear land of trees or brushwood, or from stones; to clear the sight or the voice; to clear one's self from debt; -- often used with of, off, away, or out.
  • Clear (v. t.)
    To free from impurities; to clarify; to cleanse.
  • Clear (v. t.)
    To free from obscurity or ambiguity; to relive of perplexity; to make perspicuous.
  • Clear (v. t.)
    To free from the imputation of guilt; to justify, vindicate, or acquit; -- often used with from before the thing imputed.
  • Clear (v. t.)
    To gain without deduction; to net.
  • Clear (v. t.)
    To leap or pass by, or over, without touching or failure; as, to clear a hedge; to clear a reef.
  • Clear (v. t.)
    To render bright, transparent, or undimmed; to free from clouds.
  • Clear (v. t.)
    To render more quick or acute, as the understanding; to make perspicacious.
  • Cruel (a.)
    Attended with cruetly; painful; harsh.
  • Cruel (a.)
    Causing, or fitted to cause, pain, grief, or misery.
  • Cruel (a.)
    Disposed to give pain to others; willing or pleased to hurt, torment, or afflict; destitute of sympathetic kindness and pity; savage; inhuman; hard-hearted; merciless.
  • Cruel (n.)
    See Crewel.
  • glace (unknown)
    Sorry. I don't have the meaning of this word.
  • Glare (n.)
    A bright, dazzling light; splendor that dazzles the eyes; a confusing and bewildering light.
  • Glare (n.)
    A fierce, piercing look or stare.
  • Glare (n.)
    A smooth, bright, glassy surface; as, a glare of ice.
  • Glare (n.)
    A viscous, transparent substance. See Glair.
  • Glare (n.)
    Smooth and bright or translucent; -- used almost exclusively of ice; as, skating on glare ice.
  • Glare (v. i.)
    To be bright and intense, as certain colors; to be ostentatiously splendid or gay.
  • Glare (v. i.)
    To look with fierce, piercing eyes; to stare earnestly, angrily, or fiercely.
  • Glare (v. i.)
    To shine with a bright, dazzling light.
  • Glare (v. t.)
    To shoot out, or emit, as a dazzling light.
  • Gluer (n.)
    One who cements with glue.
  • Grace (n.)
    A petition for grace; a blessing asked, or thanks rendered, before or after a meal.
  • Grace (n.)
    A play designed to promote or display grace of motion. It consists in throwing a small hoop from one player to another, by means of two sticks in the hands of each. Called also grace hoop or hoops.
  • Grace (n.)
    An act, vote, or decree of the government of the institution; a degree or privilege conferred by such vote or decree.
  • Grace (n.)
    Beauty, physical, intellectual, or moral; loveliness; commonly, easy elegance of manners; perfection of form.
  • Grace (n.)
    Fortune; luck; -- used commonly with hard or sorry when it means misfortune.
  • Grace (n.)
    Graceful and beautiful females, sister goddesses, represented by ancient writers as the attendants sometimes of Apollo but oftener of Venus. They were commonly mentioned as three in number; namely, Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia, and were regarded as the inspirers of the qualities which give attractiveness to wisdom, love, and social intercourse.
  • Grace (n.)
    Inherent excellence; any endowment or characteristic fitted to win favor or confer pleasure or benefit.
  • Grace (n.)
    Ornamental notes or short passages, either introduced by the performer, or indicated by the composer, in which case the notation signs are called grace notes, appeggiaturas, turns, etc.
  • Grace (n.)
    Thanks.
  • Grace (n.)
    The divine favor toward man; the mercy of God, as distinguished from His justice; also, any benefits His mercy imparts; divine love or pardon; a state of acceptance with God; enjoyment of the divine favor.
  • Grace (n.)
    The exercise of love, kindness, mercy, favor; disposition to benefit or serve another; favor bestowed or privilege conferred.
  • Grace (n.)
    The prerogative of mercy execised by the executive, as pardon.
  • Grace (n.)
    The same prerogative when exercised in the form of equitable relief through chancery.
  • Grace (n.)
    The title of a duke, a duchess, or an archbishop, and formerly of the king of England.
  • Grace (v. t.)
    To add grace notes, cadenzas, etc., to.
  • Grace (v. t.)
    To adorn; to decorate; to embellish and dignify.
  • Grace (v. t.)
    To dignify or raise by an act of favor; to honor.
  • Grace (v. t.)
    To supply with heavenly grace.
  • Gruel (n.)
    A light, liquid food, made by boiling meal of maize, oatmeal, or fiour in water or milk; thin porridge.
  • Gular (a.)
    Pertaining to the gula or throat; as, gular plates. See Illust. of Bird, and Bowfin.
  • lacer (unknown)
    Sorry. I don't have the meaning of this word.
  • Lager (n.)
    Lager beer.
  • Large (adv.)
    Freely; licentiously.
  • Large (n.)
    A musical note, formerly in use, equal to two longs, four breves, or eight semibreves.
  • Large (superl.)
    Abundant; ample; as, a large supply of provisions.
  • Large (superl.)
    Crossing the line of a ship's course in a favorable direction; -- said of the wind when it is abeam, or between the beam and the quarter.
  • Large (superl.)
    Exceeding most other things of like kind in bulk, capacity, quantity, superficial dimensions, or number of constituent units; big; great; capacious; extensive; -- opposed to small; as, a large horse; a large house or room; a large lake or pool; a large jug or spoon; a large vineyard; a large army; a large city.
  • Large (superl.)
    Free; unembarrassed.
  • Large (superl.)
    Full in statement; diffuse; full; profuse.
  • Large (superl.)
    Having more than usual power or capacity; having broad sympathies and generous impulses; comprehensive; -- said of the mind and heart.
  • Large (superl.)
    Prodigal in expending; lavish.
  • Large (superl.)
    Unrestrained by decorum; -- said of language.
  • Lucre (n.)
    Gain in money or goods; profit; riches; -- often in an ill sense.
  • luger (unknown)
    Sorry. I don't have the meaning of this word.
  • Regal (a.)
    Of or pertaining to a king; kingly; royal; as, regal authority, pomp, or sway.
  • Regal (n.)
    A small portable organ, played with one hand, the bellows being worked with the other, -- used in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.
  • Rugae (pl. )
    of Ruga
  • rugal (unknown)
    Sorry. I don't have the meaning of this word.
  • Ulcer (n.)
    A solution of continuity in any of the soft parts of the body, discharging purulent matter, found on a surface, especially one of the natural surfaces of the body, and originating generally in a constitutional disorder; a sore discharging pus. It is distinguished from an abscess, which has its beginning, at least, in the depth of the tissues.
  • Ulcer (n.)
    Fig.: Anything that festers and corrupts like an open sore; a vice in character.
  • Ulcer (v. t.)
    To ulcerate.
  • Ureal (a.)
    Of or pertaining to urea; containing, or consisting of, urea; as, ureal deposits.
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unscramble culrage