We found 18 words by descrambling these letters KEAWE

4 Letter Words Unscramble From Letters keawe


3 Letter Words Unscramble From Letters keawe


2 Letter Words Unscramble From Letters keawe


More About The Unscrambled Letters KEAWE

Our word unscrambler discovered 18 words from the 5 scrambled letters (A E E K W) you search for!

Furthermore, we grouped the results into the following categories:

  • There are 6 - 4 letter words
  • There are 8 - 3 letter words
  • There are 4 - 2 letter words

What Can The Letters KEAWE Mean ?

These are the meanings of the letters KEAWE when you unscramble them.

  • akee (unknown)
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  • awee (unknown)
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  • Wake (n.)
    An annual parish festival formerly held in commemoration of the dedication of a church. Originally, prayers were said on the evening preceding, and hymns were sung during the night, in the church; subsequently, these vigils were discontinued, and the day itself, often with succeeding days, was occupied in rural pastimes and exercises, attended by eating and drinking, often to excess.
  • Wake (n.)
    The act of waking, or being awaked; also, the state of being awake.
  • Wake (n.)
    The sitting up of persons with a dead body, often attended with a degree of festivity, chiefly among the Irish.
  • Wake (n.)
    The state of forbearing sleep, especially for solemn or festive purposes; a vigil.
  • Wake (n.)
    The track left by a vessel in the water; by extension, any track; as, the wake of an army.
  • Wake (v. i.)
    To be excited or roused from sleep; to awake; to be awakened; to cease to sleep; -- often with up.
  • Wake (v. i.)
    To be exited or roused up; to be stirred up from a dormant, torpid, or inactive state; to be active.
  • Wake (v. i.)
    To be or to continue awake; to watch; not to sleep.
  • Wake (v. i.)
    To sit up late festive purposes; to hold a night revel.
  • Wake (v. t.)
    To bring to life again, as if from the sleep of death; to reanimate; to revive.
  • Wake (v. t.)
    To put in motion or action; to arouse; to excite.
  • Wake (v. t.)
    To rouse from sleep; to awake.
  • Wake (v. t.)
    To watch, or sit up with, at night, as a dead body.
  • Weak (a.)
    To make or become weak; to weaken.
  • Weak (v. i.)
    Deficient in strength of body; feeble; infirm; sickly; debilitated; enfeebled; exhausted.
  • Weak (v. i.)
    Feeble of mind; wanting discernment; lacking vigor; spiritless; as, a weak king or magistrate.
  • Weak (v. i.)
    Lacking ability for an appropriate function or office; as, weak eyes; a weak stomach; a weak magistrate; a weak regiment, or army.
  • Weak (v. i.)
    Lacking force of utterance or sound; not sonorous; low; small; feeble; faint.
  • Weak (v. i.)
    Lacking in elements of political strength; not wielding or having authority or energy; deficient in the resources that are essential to a ruler or nation; as, a weak monarch; a weak government or state.
  • Weak (v. i.)
    Not able to resist external force or onset; easily subdued or overcome; as, a weak barrier; as, a weak fortress.
  • Weak (v. i.)
    Not able to sustain a great weight, pressure, or strain; as, a weak timber; a weak rope.
  • Weak (v. i.)
    Not able to withstand temptation, urgency, persuasion, etc.; easily impressed, moved, or overcome; accessible; vulnerable; as, weak resolutions; weak virtue.
  • Weak (v. i.)
    Not firmly united or adhesive; easily broken or separated into pieces; not compact; as, a weak ship.
  • Weak (v. i.)
    Not having full confidence or conviction; not decided or confirmed; vacillating; wavering.
  • Weak (v. i.)
    Not having power to convince; not supported by force of reason or truth; unsustained; as, a weak argument or case.
  • Weak (v. i.)
    Not possessing or manifesting intellectual, logical, moral, or political strength, vigor, etc.
  • Weak (v. i.)
    Not prevalent or effective, or not felt to be prevalent; not potent; feeble.
  • Weak (v. i.)
    Not stiff; pliant; frail; soft; as, the weak stalk of a plant.
  • Weak (v. i.)
    Not thoroughly or abundantly impregnated with the usual or required ingredients, or with stimulating and nourishing substances; of less than the usual strength; as, weak tea, broth, or liquor; a weak decoction or solution; a weak dose of medicine.
  • Weak (v. i.)
    Pertaining to, or designating, a noun in Anglo-Saxon, etc., the stem of which ends in -n. See Strong, 19 (b).
  • Weak (v. i.)
    Pertaining to, or designating, a verb which forms its preterit (imperfect) and past participle by adding to the present the suffix -ed, -d, or the variant form -t; as in the verbs abash, abashed; abate, abated; deny, denied; feel, felt. See Strong, 19 (a).
  • Weak (v. i.)
    Resulting from, or indicating, lack of judgment, discernment, or firmness; unwise; hence, foolish.
  • Weak (v. i.)
    Tending towards lower prices; as, a weak market.
  • Weak (v. i.)
    Wanting in point or vigor of expression; as, a weak sentence; a weak style.
  • Weak (v. i.)
    Wanting in power to influence or bind; as, weak ties; a weak sense of honor of duty.
  • Weak (v. i.)
    Wanting physical strength.
  • Week (n.)
    A period of seven days, usually that reckoned from one Sabbath or Sunday to the next.
  • Weka (n.)
    A New Zealand rail (Ocydromus australis) which has wings so short as to be incapable of flight.
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unscramble keawe